26 February 2010

Anglophila...(once again)



...this time with the full benefit of British made goods. I acquired a sports jacket today, and I suspect it may well be the nicest and most well made thing I've discovered in a thrift shop to date:
This three button, darted jacket is made of cloth of exceptional quality, a full heavy weight meant most likely for outdoor use. If that cloth ain't the epitome of British style, I don't know what is.

Four button working cuffs. I'm more or less a two button cuff kind of guy, but that sure is some nice work. Again, check that fabric up close...so nice.
Shallow side vents,

There's even this little button under the right lapel, for closing it at the neck, further evidence that this piece was once likely at home in damp weather hunting for ducks, or some other leisurely pass-time involving rifles, dogs and the English countryside. Note the finishing on the collar, real old school tailoring. Not surprising given where it originated.

Davies and Son, a top tier London tailor shop. There pedigree is undeniable, having outfitted Admiral Lord Nelson, King George V, and the Duke of Windsor, among others. Follow that link and read their history. And how about that date, 15 June 1960? Incredible. This is the real thing here. I almost feel unworthy of it. All that nice stuff I have from Andover Shop, Brooks Brothers, even my Barbour jacket was made in a factory. This is on another level entirely.

Now for the funny part:

I spotted this jacket on Wednesday. Because of it $10.99 price tag, I took a pass. Everyone knows that the first, if only, rule of thrift shopping is 'get it while you can'. If you walk out that door and come back even 1/2 hour later, your big score will be gone. This morning, I awoke determined to rush back after breakfast in the hopes that this jacket might still be there. Fortunately, it was.

How spoiled have I become that $10.99 was more than I was willing to spend for such a thing? Seriously, what the Hell is wrong with me?But I suppose that's the best kind of spoiled: spoiled on cheapness. Is there a word for that? (be nice)

This thing is going to kill with some cavalry twill pants.

22 comments:

Young Fogey said...

Fantastic score! I think that pattern is called a gun club tweed.

Now all you need is a dog and a shotgun--oh, wait. Nevermind. ;-)

Wear it in good health!

David said...

That one is simply incredible. It's rare you find something with an actual date on it, not to mention something custom made. Look forward to seeing it all paired up.

I recently found a similar jacket by Chipp of New Haven.

Scott Alexander said...

Caring for the best jacket can only do so much. The inherent quality is clear after seeing this thing 50 years strong. I'm quite happy for you.
You could always make use of it shooting soda cans with a slingshot and marbles.

Old Trad said...

Anglophilia is what Trad is all about.

Rebecca said...

When you come up with a word for "spoiled on cheapness", include it in your post title so I won't miss it! It definitely describes me.

Congratulations on this most excellent purchase.

The Preppy Pauper said...

I have found a couple of custom made suits while thrifting and the dangerous part is getting used to the workmanship and quality of fabric. And we know what the retail cost of custom tailoring can run...

Anonymous said...

Could this gentleman be the original owner of that fine jacket?

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?isbn=0253337976

David V said...

$10.99!
I would have waited for the tag to go 1/2 price and then kicked myself when i found it gone.
You did the right thing.

spoozyliciouzz said...

I always thought such a jacket would go by the name of "houndstooth", or is this just the name of the fabric design?

Diego Rafael Sanchez B said...

Please let us know the name of this pattern on the jacket.

I recently returned from Colombia South America and this pattern is known as "the Scot" as in Scottish (of course in Spanish) and is considerd a classic for men to wear down there in the capital city.

Great Find as always

Anders the Swede said...

A really nice jacket, great find and yes you must be spoiled on cheapness.

I think the pattern could be called houndstooth.

Found similar on this site (see GUN CLUB TWEED JACKET):
http://www.tweed-jacket.com/Gallery%20Page.html

Lisa said...

Oh how I love your blog. I get some of the greatest ideas from you and I love to scour the thrift shops. I can sew, so a lot of things pass muster because I can tailor them to fit Me. The real reason for my comment is my continued "AWE" for your revealing that Fels Naptha was still available. (I remember my grandmother using it). I can't begin to tell you the number of garments that have been saved from the dust bin because of this revelation!! LOVE IT and your blog. Carry on.

ManWithTheGoldenArm said...

Nie find! Any chance we can see some photos of someone wearing it?

NCJack said...

$10.99 and you almost passed because you get such killer deals on a regular basis: the word is "insufferable" :>

Will try to see you and berate you further at the big "Threepenny Flea Opera" in May. NC ought to be getting hot enough by that time that a NE trip will be lookin' good

Anonymous said...

Lisa:

Not only Fels Naptha, but other old brands like Lifebuoy soap and Bon Ami cleanser are available from www.vermontcountrystore.com

Diego Rafael Sanchez B said...

Yeah, I could see that it would be houndstooth.

But I was Wondering if the red over overcheck and the overall square like pattern has a name to it...

Some Assembly Required said...

I've got a serious case of bargainfreude from this...

Young Fogey said...

IT'S A GUN CLUB CHECK!

Ahem. Sorry; I got carried away there.

Although at first glance it may appear to have a certain houndstoothiness to it, it is not a houndstooth.

A gun club check has a distinctive overcheck (red for this jacket; its material is in a classic color combination for a gun club check), and its pattern comes from the intersections of the colors. Like most checks, those lines are straight (think of a red & white tablecloth at an Italian restaurant for the basic notion of check).

In contrast, a houndstooth is a "broken" check, in that the lines are not perfectly straight. Also, it does not have the half-tone effect of other checks; a houndstooth is a tone and tone, as opposed to checks, which are more of a tone on tone. Look at the gray "stripes" on this jacket, and how they are interwoven with the background tan and with each other, resulting in variegation. You don't see this in houndstooths (houndsteeth? ;-)

It's a gun club check--and a fabulous find.

Thad said...

Don't know about the exact pattern, but it is likely a Shetland Keepers Tweed. From the brief description and the appearance, I would guess that it is a 26oz (725gm) cloth, which is also occasionally known as thornproof tweed. Currently, the cloth alone runs at roughly $100 per meter.

What can I say, great jacket!

tintin said...

I hope the sleeve length is close. If not, to keep the buttons working is gonna cost you north of $75. So why don't you just send it to me.

Dhr. DeLuxe said...

Oops, I meant this one:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/metrolibraryarchive/4079179106/

Dhr. DeLuxe said...

Here's the former owner, looking quite dapper:
http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?isbn=0253337976