07 March 2010

It's What's on the Inside That Counts

One of the nice things about proper men's wear is how little it really changes. When you find the good stuff, it doesn't matter how old it is or how ling you plan on owning it. The stuff has staying power. That being said, sometimes the most interesting thing to talk about is the lining.

Take for instance this navy flannel blazer. It's a two button sack, lapped seams, deep patch pockets. You don't need a photo of the outside because you already know what it looks like. The inside, however, is quite another story.

Even from a distance I'm sure you can tell that's one hell of a lining,
Cricketeer for Kennedy's. I seem to be turning those two names up a lot lately,

Made "The American Way", with wool. I guess that means when I wear it the sky will seem bluer, the beer will seem cheaper, and the burgers will taste beefier. Just wait, it gets better.
Here we see two birds in flight, likely a hawk chasing some other bird,

Bingo! The hawk wins every time!
All this while a gentry falconer looks on from atop his favorite mare on the grounds of the family manor in the country.

A fairly un-American scene for such an American piece of clothing. I guess we can call it a case of mis-directed Anglophila?

I actually bought this to sell at the Top Shelf Flea. But it fits me better than my old flannel blazer, and its ten times cooler. I think I might just have to keep it, even if that does break the old rule about the drug dealer using his own stuff.

12 comments:

OldSchool said...

"One of the nice things about proper men's wear is how little it really changes."

Giuseppe,

The key word there is "proper". Unfortunately, we live in times where words/concepts such as "propriety" and "dignity" are linked to historical class attitudes and consequently are commonly derided.

Thanks for continuing to fight the good fight.

JRS said...

Hahaha - great post! Don't get high on your own supply...

Thad said...

But, you know the drug is good when the dealer uses it!

TRVS said...

The lining is wonderful, I'd keep it just for that. Having the same problem deciding what to add to my offerings at TSF, parting is such sweet sorrow . . .

BadScene said...

I've also been finding a lot of Cricketeer, however nothing with that bit of detailing on the inside. Great find!

tweedydon said...

I just wanted to say that this is a *terrific* blog--thank you!

Christina, Esq. said...

So much craftsmanship goes into lining well tailored blazers and jackets. Sometimes the best part of an article is only visible from the inside out. (Kind of like a lot of people I know.) Fashion is full of metaphors!

vir beātum said...

My Dear Old Thing! I'm sorry, but serendipity has only just sent me your way. What a frightfully jolly blog, and much after my own heart. Might I be so bold as to offer a sample of my own wares, trusting only to borrow you and your good followers for a trifling moment?
beingmanly.blogspot.com: inheriting tradition

gant blazer said...

I love the lining, you can look slick and smart on the outside but have a secret inside, loves it.

Bob said...

I found a Cricketeer tie in a thrift shop the other day. It was a silk red and blue stripe and was hanging from the hook knotted. I undid the knot and wouldn't you know it, a worn patch! Should I have bought it anyway and tied the knot the same way? I should mention that it was a dollar.

Giuseppe said...

Bob,

I would have tried the tie on myself. There's always a chance that a difference in the way you knot it compared to the previous owner might had the worn bit. Or, for a buck, you could bye it and send it to Ellie Laveer and have it made into a bow tie.

B said...

I've got an old Cricketeer three-piece, gray pinstripe that belonged to my grandfather. It's a great suit. The manufacturing leaves something to be desired, but the fit is outstanding.